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The Montreal Science Centre

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A huge complex located within the Old Port, the Montreal Science Centre introduces children to the worlds of science and technology with hands-on workshops, experiments and games. The focus of this center is almost entirely on kids, but we were drawn by a temporary exhibit called “Animal Inside Out.”

Science Center voiles en voiles

Adults aren’t going to get much out of the Montreal Science Centre’s permanent exhibits, but kids will have a blast. The museum’s main attraction is called “Human,” and explores the human body with a wide-range of activities that exercise all of the senses. Another permanent exhibit is the “Creative Factory,” which is basically the high-tech playground of every child’s dreams, although it’s questionable whether any scientific knowledge seeps into their brains as they spin themselves around on a disc, play with derby cars, or forge two-meter whirlwinds in a chamber.

Luckily, the Montreal Science Centre also has awesome temporary exhibits, and “Animal Inside Out” is probably one that should carry an NC-17 rating. If I’d seen this as a kid, I’d have nightmares for a week! The title was accurate: it features real animals (including humans) displayed from the inside out. They’ve been peeled back layer-by-layer, revealing the muscles which lay under the flesh, the capillary systems, the internal organs and the bones.

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It’s the work of German scientist Gunther von Hagen, who sparked controversy years ago with his famous Body Works exhibit, which used the same embalming technique (called “plastination”) on humans. We never had the chance to see Body Works, but “Animal Inside Out” was fascinating. You don’t realize just how similar humans are to other species until you start stripping back the layers.

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The Science Centre also has an excellent IMAX theater, which shows both nature documentaries and mainstream hits like Star Wars. And nearby, there’s another outdoor attraction that kids will love. Voiles en Voiles is a pirate-themed aerial adventure park where children can harness up to climb ropes, crawl across logs and speed down ziplines. It looks like a blast; if I were twelve again, I would try to spend every day here.

Locations on our Map: Montreal Science Centre | Voiles en Voiles
Montreal Science Centre – Website
Voiles en Voiles – Website

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April 20, 2016 at 7:18 pm Comments (0)

Le Centre d’histoire de Montréal

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If your thirst for history isn’t quenched after visiting the Archaeology and History Complex Pointe-à-Callière, then walk a few dozen meters down the Place d’Youville and into the Montreal History Center. I’m not sure we’ve visited another city which has two history museums in such close proximity to each other, let alone two as impressive as these.

Le Centre dHistorie de Montréal

The Pointe-à-Callière is the larger and more memorable of the two museums, but the History Center has a lot to recommend it as well, including the fact that it’s much cheaper. The museum occupies the old red-brick building of the Central Fire Station, which closed in 1972.

The permanent exhibition, found on the bottom floor, takes visitors on a well-organized tour through the centuries. Whereas the Pointe-à-Callière focused on the archaeology, here the emphasis is on the people of Montreal. A series of exhibits allows you to “meet” the different groups who have come to the island, from the Iroquois, English and French, to immigrants from Ireland and even a modern family from Chile.

Le Centre dHistorie de Montréal

We also liked the short videos that accompanied every epoch of Montreal’s history. Using maps and old photographs, these demonstrated in a chronological fashion how the city has grown from its earliest days behind fortified walls, to the installation of tramways and metro lines, and its eventual expansion over the entire island.

On its upper floors, the History Center hosts temporary exhibits, most of which are probably pretty good, if the one we saw is any indication. The exhibition titled “Scandal! Vice, Crime and Morality in Montreal, 1940-1960” introduced us to the city’s famously seedy side. Underground gay clubs, secret casinos, Mafia bosses gunned down in broad daylight and a notoriously corrupt police force? I want to hear more about this Montreal!

Location on our Map
Centre d’histoire de Montréal – Website

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April 17, 2016 at 10:48 pm Comment (1)

The Underground City

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A vast network of tunnels leading to practically all of downtown Montreal’s shopping malls, food courts, office buildings, metro stations, museums and theaters, the so-called Underground City enables people to get around without ever having to step foot outside. And in this city, that can often be a real life-saver.

Montreal Underground City

When we arrived in early April, we expected to occasionally make use of the Underground City. But we hadn’t expected to depend upon it. On our second full day in Montreal, the city experienced a vicious cold snap, which sent temperatures plummeting below freezing and dumped inches of snow onto the streets.

Now, Jürgen and I might be from northern climes (he’s from Germany, and I grew up in northern Minnesota) but there’s a reason we chose Valencia, Spain as our permanent base. And that reason is: we don’t like the cold. The last time we saw snow was four years ago, and it’s not some kind of wild coincidence. We arrange things like that! So when this April storm hit, it was a surprise, and not one we appreciated. We whimpered and complained like children. We bundled up like Arctic explorers. And whenever circumstances forced us to step outside, we scampered like rats toward the nearest entrance of the Underground City.

Montreal Underground City

“Underground City” is certainly an evocative name, bringing to mind a sort of subterranean, alternative Montreal, populated perhaps by near-sighted mole-people. But the reality isn’t that exotic. Montrealers are often amused to learn that their elaborate maze of tunnels has become a bonafide tourist attraction… because that’s really all the Underground City is: tunnels which lead from one set of buildings to the next.

To long-time residents, these passageways are purely utilitarian; part of their boring, daily commute. But to newcomers like us, the Underground City is much more interesting. Many of the tunnels are decorated with art. There’s odd architecture, and an endless array of shops. The interior courtyards to which they lead are often beautiful. It’s fun to emerge from a random passageway into surroundings which are entirely new and unexpected. And the people-watching is great, especially when cold weather drives the city’s numerous crazies underground.

During the snowstorm, we dedicated an entire afternoon to the Underground City. It went something like this: Oof, it’s cold out there. Which way should we go? Check out that fountain! And there’s a piece of the Berlin Wall. And an ice-skating rink. This lobby is sweet… are we in a hotel? Can we go up these stairs? Okay, Mr. Security Guy, we get it; please calm down. The Tunnel Espresso Bar must be good, but that line is crazy. [Gasp] An entire store dedicated to board games… and there’s a comics shop! I’m gonna need an hour, Jürgen, go away. This tunnel leads from the Eaton Mall to the Cours Mont-Royal Mall. Malls interconnected to other malls: a stroke of evil genius. Oh, that poor Chinese woman is so drunk she can’t stand, should we help her? (No, Jürgen, I was joking!) How did we end up at a Barbie exhibition? Wait, I don’t believe it. Look at that poster: Godspeed You Black Emperor are playing next week. I forgot they were from Montreal. The booth is right there, I’m buying tickets. No, I shouldn’t, we’re trying to save money. Arrgh, but I have to!!!!!

If that isn’t among our most action-packed days in Montreal, I’ll be surprised.

Montreal Underground City

We made an effort, but it’s impossible to see all of the Underground City in one day. And the truth is, you wouldn’t really want to. Although we had fun during our excursion, much it was boring… mall after mall, Starbucks after Starbucks. (At least there were plenty of places to re-up on caffeine.) And while some tunnels have been beautified with art, many others are just boring old tunnels. Still, the Underground City is an impressive feat of urban engineering, which deserves to be seen. It comprises over twenty miles worth of passageways and, during winter, is used daily by over half a million people.

It seems unlikely that you wouldn’t visit the Underground City at least once during your visit to Montreal, even if you don’t realize it. But if the weather’s bad, it’s worth making an effort. Grab a map, plot a course, and dive underground to see a totally different side of Montreal.

Map of the Underground City

Car Rental Prices For Montreal

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April 15, 2016 at 10:54 pm Comments (3)

Museum of Archaeology and History Pointe-à-Callière

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Before doing anything else, newcomers to Montreal might want to check out the Archaeology and History Complex Pointe-à-Callière. Located at the site where Montreal was born, this museum takes visitors on a journey through the life of the city, from its earliest occupation into the present day.

Pointe-à-Callière Museum

The tour starts in a small auditorium overlooking a set of ruins. Pointe-à-Callière is more than just an archaeology museum; it’s also an archaeological site. Before the museum opened in 1992, scientists had spent a decade here, digging into the city’s past and revealing over six hundred years worth of artifacts. This is the spot where the first settlers came ashore about four hundred years ago, and where some of the city’s original buildings were erected.

We sat down in the theater, put headphones on, and spent the next twenty minutes watching a show which brought Montreal’s history to life, with scenes illuminated atop the exposed ruins. The story started centuries before the arrival of the Europeans, with the Iroquois and Algonquin settling the island. We learned about the founding of the French city, the struggles and successes with the native population, the switch from French to English dominion, the city’s experience during the Great Depression and the World Wars, and how Montreal has grown into the modern age.

Pointe-à-Callière Museum

Once the show had finished, we moved downstairs into the archaeological site to examine some of the ruins uncovered at the Pointe-à-Callière, including the Royal Customs House and the old Catholic Graveyard. We saw the remains of the Little Saint-Pierre River, which was swallowed up and used for sewage by the expanding city. And we learned about Montreal’s tumultuous relationship with the Iroquois, which came to an end in 1701 with the “Great Peace,” when a massive delegation of forty tribes declared a ceasefire with the settlers.

Other sections of the museum are more geared toward children, including a permanent exhibition about pirates, and sandboxes where kids can conduct their own archaeological digs. There are also wide-ranging temporary exhibits in the neighboring Mariners’ House. The show which happened to be there during our visit was dedicated to Agatha Christie. That might at first seem like an odd fit for an archaeology museum, but the exhibition concentrated on the famous author’s second marriage to Sir Max Mallowan, an archaeologist. With him, she traveled to the Middle East, and participated in excavations which had a great influence upon her writing.

Pointe-à-Callière Museum

After finishing with the exhibits in the Mariners’ House, we returned to the Éperon Building and ascended to the top floor, where we enjoyed views of the Old Port and Old Montreal from the outdoor platform. And then, having fully earned a big meal, we descended to the third floor and sat down at L’Arrivage, the museum’s restaurant. A fancier place with ultra-correct waiters and a reasonably-priced lunchtime menu, this is a popular place and requires a reservation.

Location on our Map
Archaeology and History Complex Pointe-à-Callière – Website

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April 14, 2016 at 1:15 pm Comments (0)

The Notre-Dame Basilica

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When it opened in 1830, Montreal’s Notre-Dame was the largest church in North America, and it would remain so for fifty years. Today, this French Gothic Revival basilica is one of the top attractions in the city.

Notre Dame Montreal

In 1640, during the earliest days of the French colony, the Sulpician Order built the first church of Notre-Dame across from the Place d’Armes. But after a couple hundred years, there were far too many worshipers for the humble church. To reflect its growing power and influence, Montreal required a much grander place of worship.

So the decision was made to tear down the old Notre-Dame, and build something new. James O’Donnell was the architect in charge of the project. This Irish-American protestant was a curious choice for a cathedral in French-speaking Montreal, but it turned out to be an inspired one. Apparently, you don’t need to be Catholic to build catholic churches. Hoping to be buried in his finest architectural creation, O’Donnell converted to Catholicism shortly before his death, and is still the only person entombed in the basilica’s crypt.

Notre Dame Montreal

With its two Gothic towers and ornate facade, the Notre-Dame strikes a fine figure when viewed from the Place d’Armes, which it faces. But it isn’t until you step inside that its true beauty is revealed. Bathed in blue and gold, with vaulted ceilings, colorful stained glass, intricate pine carvings and a massive altarpiece, there’s not a corner of the Notre-Dame which fails to impress.

The basilica’s stained glass windows provide a unique touch. They don’t depict religious scenes, as would normally be the case for a church, but moments from the founding of Montreal. Instead of Jesus on the crucifix or the assumption of Mary, we see events like the arrival of the French at the Pointe-à-Callière, the construction of the church, and the re-education of the natives.

The windows will pull your attention to the side, the magnificent altarpiece will bring it to the front, and the blue vaulted roof will compel you to look up, but don’t forget to turn around. At the back of the church, you’ll find another highlight: a giant organ dating from 1891 and made of 7000 individual pipes. It’s recently been tuned (a process which took weeks), and according to our guide, sounds better than ever before. The organ is played during Sunday service.

Behind the altar, we found the Sacré-Cœur Chapel. After an arson attack in 1978, this chapel was completely rebuilt by a team of master carpenters, who used only linden wood. With natural light pouring in from above and illuminating the wooden statues and modern altarpiece, this chapel feels entirely different to the rest of the cathedral; warmer and more rustic. More Canadian, somehow.

Location on our Map
Notre-Dame Basilica – Website

Framed Montreal Photographs

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April 13, 2016 at 3:46 pm Comments (0)

Let’s Go Habs!

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Established in 1909, the Montreal Canadiens are the world’s oldest still-active hockey team, as well as its most successful, having won more Stanley Cups than any other. We arrived in Montreal at the tail end of the 2015-16 campaign, and snatched up tickets for one of the final matches of the year. How could we ever claim to “know” Montreal, if we hadn’t seen the Canadiens take the ice?

Montreal Canadiens

Le Club de Hockey Canadien, as the team is officially known, was one of the “Original Six” of the NHL, but actually predates the league’s formation by eight years. It was originally part of the National Hockey Association, a small league which operated in Quebec and Ontario.

The team was founded to represent Montreal’s French population, perhaps explaining the intensity of their support. The Canadiens are an integral aspect of the city’s identity, and even when they’re playing poorly, they sell out every game. For nearly eleven years, the Centre Bell sold-out 422 consecutive matches; the streak might have continued indefinitely, but the club broke it intentionally in December 2014, to honor the passing of Jean Beliveau, who had been one of their biggest stars.

Montreal Canadiens

Which brings us to the puzzle of their nickname. Throughout the match, the fans around us weren’t screaming for the “Canadiens,” but for the “Habs.” Try as we might, we couldn’t figure out what this meant. Haberdashers, because their threads are so sweet? Habaneros, because the team is so hot? We learned later that it stands for “les Habitants,” a term referring to the original French settlers of Quebec.

The weekday match we saw didn’t go well for the Habs, who went down in a humiliating 4-1 defeat to the first-place Florida Panthers. But despite their poor performance, we had a fun night at the arena, thanks largely to the enthusiasm of the fans. Consider: this was a meaningless Tuesday-night match at the end of another bad season, after the Habs had already been eliminated from playoff contention, and it was still sold out. Win or lose, the people of Montreal will support their club through seemingly anything.

The Centre Bell has been home to the Canadiens since 1996, and many old-school Montrealers blame it for the downturn in the team’s fortunes. We liked the stadium, though; it’s right downtown and has the atmosphere is incredible. Even from our seats in the very back row of the Molson Fan Zone, we were able to see all the action. And we were even able to spot Youppi, the team’s mascot… who looked immediately familiar to me. Turns out, Youppi had been the mascot of the Montreal Expos until they moved to DC. He apparently wanted to stay in Montreal, and so became the first major-league mascot to switch sports.

We had shown up well before game-time to get drinks and dinner at La Cage Aux Sports, a rollicking bar built into the Centre Bell, accessible from both inside and outside the arena. The place was packed to the gills, and we were nearly the only patrons not sporting Canadiens gear. If you want to go to La Cage, plan at least an hour to get in and eat. There’s no better way to warm up for the match than with a plate of poutine and a pitcher of Molson.

Location on our Map
Montreal Canadiens – Official Website

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April 12, 2016 at 6:09 pm Comments (2)

A Beginner’s Guide to Montreal

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The day after we arrived in Montreal, a freak snowstorm hit the city, stranding us indoors. We would have rather been outside exploring, but the bad weather provided an excuse for us to sit down and read about our new home. Here are the facts and figures that jumped out at us.

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Size: With a total population of just over four million, Montreal is the largest city in Quebec, the second-largest in Canada, and just beats out Seattle as the nineteenth-largest city in North America. Although it’s not the capital of Quebec (that would be nearby Quebec City), Montreal is the undisputed center of the province’s culture and commerce.

Layout: Montreal occupies a large island roughly in the middle of Saint Lawrence River, which connects the Northern Atlantic with Lake Ontario. In the center of this island is a large hill called Mount Royal, which provides the city with its name. The Island of Montreal is the world’s most populated fresh-water island.

History: The city was founded in 1642 by French settlers, and quickly became the center of New France’s fur trade. Before the arrival of the Europeans, it had been home to various tribes of the First Nations, the indigenous people of Canada, particularly the Iroquois and Algonquin. The British took Quebec in 1760, after the Seven Years War, and Montreal became part of Canada.

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Language: Les Montréalaise parlent Français, s’il vous plâit! But that’s not the whole story. French is definitely the dominant language in the city, but nearly 20% of residents are native English-speakers, while another 20% have another primary language (Italian, Arabic and Spanish are the most prominent, each at around 3%). Montreal is nothing if not multi-cultural, and you’ll also hear Chinese, Portuguese, Russian, Vietnamese and Greek in various pockets of the city.

Economy: Montreal boasts one of the world’s largest inland ports, and has traditionally been one of North America’s main railroad cities. Canada’s largest oil refinery was based here, though it closed in 2010. Important industries today include film and television, videogames, finance and the aerospace sector.

Culture: Approximately 72% of the city’s population have at one time been a member of the Cirque du Soleil, and you can’t walk down the sidewalk without getting kicked in the face by some clown flipping around on a curtain. But the city has a lot more to offer than acrobatics, including a seemingly endless supply of theaters, concert halls, festivals and clubs. Montreal has a legendary indie music scene, and is home to both the world’s largest jazz festival, as well as its largest comedy festival.

Sports: You might be shocked to learn that the most popular sport in this Canadian city is hockey. The Montreal Canadiens have won more Stanley Cups than any other NHL team, and are massively popular… although they’re currently in the midst of a long drought. Baseball had been popular here until 2004, when the Expos moved to Washington. In 2012, Major League Soccer expanded to the city with the Impact, who have proven popular. And Montreal is also home to one of the world’s most-watched televised sporting events: the Canadian Grand Prix, held on the Island of Notre Dame.

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April 11, 2016 at 11:29 pm Comments (0)

Bonjour Montréal!

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For the sixteenth edition of our “For 91 Days” travel project, Jürgen and I chose Montreal: the second-largest city in Canada, and a multilingual hotbed of culture and the arts. We arrived at the beginning of April with no prior knowledge of the city and no expectations. So we were excited to see what Montreal had to offer us, and would be giving the city 91 days to impress us.

Bonjour Montreal

Before landing in a new destination, Jürgen and I normally do a lot of research. We buy travel guides, study maps, and pore over whatever information we can dig up on the internet. By the time we arrive in our new 91-day home, we’ve usually got lists of things to do, and a basic understanding of the culture, currency, language and layout of the city or region we’re visiting. But we didn’t do any of this for Montreal.

Part of it was a lack of time. After finishing 91 days in Curaçao, we spent the next few weeks on a whirlwind tour of the USA, visiting friends in DC and San Francisco, catching up with family in Ohio, and returning to Savannah, which had been one of our first destinations. Given all this activity, we simply didn’t have a chance to read the Montreal guidebooks we had ordered. In fact, we never took them out of the box in which they’d arrived.

Another reason for our negligence was the fact that Montreal is just over the border from the US. We’re not talking about Sri Lanka or Korea, here; I didn’t need to brush up on cultural etiquette or prepare myself for any bizarre customs. I’m from the States, and Canada is my good buddy to the north. We share sports leagues and even an international dialing prefix. And so, despite never having spent any time in Montreal, I didn’t feel much need to research.

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And then we arrived in the city, and it’s like… for a long time, your good buddy has been inviting you over to his house, but you’ve never bothered, even though he lives just up the street. One day, you finally stop by, and are immediately surprised by the differences between your house and his. His parents are speaking French and there are European paintings on the walls. They have plastic bags of milk in their fridge. Everyone is so polite, and for dinner they serve you this delicious pile of french fries smothered in gravy. From now on, you’ll have a different appreciation for your buddy. The truth is, you don’t really know anyone until you hang out at their house.

So here we are, Montreal… let’s see what you’ve got. We’re excited to get to know you, and somehow sorry that it’s taken so long.

List Of Montreal Hotels

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April 10, 2016 at 8:00 pm Comments (8)

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The Montreal Science Centre A huge complex located within the Old Port, the Montreal Science Centre introduces children to the worlds of science and technology with hands-on workshops, experiments and games. The focus of this center is almost entirely on kids, but we were drawn by a temporary exhibit called "Animal Inside Out."
For 91 Days