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Our Home in Montreal

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The most difficult part of our travel project is the search for a suitable temporary home. 91 days is a strange amount of time, neither short- nor long-term, and it’s always scary to book an apartment in a city we’ve never visited. So, when we luck out with a place as nice as our home in Montreal, we feel like we should share.

Our studio apartment was found in the very heart of Old Montreal, literally around the corner from the Basilica de Notre-Dame. Despite its prime location in a zone so inundated with tourists, the apartment manages to be quiet, because it’s on a side street without much traffic.

And the building is itself a part of Montreal’s rich history. It was constructed in 1900 for the Canadian Pacific railroad company as their telegraph building. The top floors were used as offices for receiving and sending messages, while the lower floors were designed as apartments. The foyer is a thing of beauty, and the building is today a historic landmark that appears on walking tours of the Old Town. It’s kind of cool to return home to a building that a group of tourists are taking pictures of.

The apartment itself is a large studio, with a wall separating the bedroom from the living room, and a fully-equipped kitchen. It’s not gigantic, but large enough for two people to live comfortably. There’s stable, high-speed internet, a television with dozens of channels, an iron, coffee machine and all the other types of amenities you might expect. And crucially, the apartments stays toasty in the winter. Additionally, there’s a community rooftop terrace, with incredible views of the old town.

We loved our stay in the Canadian Pacific Telegraph Building. It was really convenient for us to be in the center of Old Montreal, close to so many touristic sights. And the nearest subway station is just a five-minute walk, so we could easily zip around the city. The apartment’s owner, Mauricio, is a great guy; responsive, friendly, and easy to communicate with. If you’re interested in a historic place to stay while in Montreal, check out his Airbnb page, and get in touch!

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July 17, 2016 at 4:14 pm Comment (1)

Montreal’s Best Food … Is Asian?

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In the future, when we look back on our favorite culinary experiences in Montreal, we’re not going to be thinking about the city’s bistros or pastisseries. We won’t even be remembering poutine all that fondly. No, we’ll be thinking about the restaurants of Chinatown, where we ate constantly and never once had a bad meal.

Montreal does have great cuisine. I mean, this is a city with its heart in France, so food is a central part of its identity. But we didn’t always love the traditional French-Canadian meals we ordered in the city. Often they were overpriced, simply not that good, or both. And we found that poutine, while delicious, is always served with heavy sides of self-disgust and regret.

But there was one place where we were always able to find a meal that was delicious, affordable and relatively healthy: Chinatown. We lived close to this neighborhood, and whenever we didn’t feel like cooking, or had just dropped way too much cash on another uppity hipster joint, we returned here.

It’s not just Chinese food that you can find in Chinatown: there are restaurants specializing in Vietnamese, Korean, Japanese, Mongolian and Hong Kong cuisine. We had incredible ramen, hot-pot, dumplings, bibimbap, shabu-shabu and pho. We loved every restaurant we ate at, and although we quickly gathered a few favorites, we never ran out of new places to try out.

If you’re looking for great places to eat in Chinatown, here are some of the restaurants we can recommend:

Nouilles de Lan Zhou – Found above an excellent Asian supermarket, this is a small place with incredible hand-pulled noodles served in huge portions, with a rich broth. [Location]

Montreal Asian Food

Sumo Ramen – Japanese ramen done correctly is always difficult to find, but Sumo Ramen knows what’s up. They also make a Sumo-style poutine. [Location]

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Orange Rouge – The only Asian restaurant in Chinatown where the staff and clientele are almost entirely white; it’s more expensive than its neighbors, but the food is outstanding. [Location]

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Chez Bong – Excellent Korean food. We had bibimbap and kimchijjigae, and felt both were as good as the meals we had while living in Busan. [Location]

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Kagayaki Shabu Shabu – Stylish and fun, with delicious boiling pots of broth, this is a great place to come with a small group of friends before a big night out. [Location]

Montreal Asian Food

Mai Xiang Yuan Dumplings – Scarfing down dozens of fried dumplings is probably not the healthiest option in Chinatown, but sometimes it’s worth it. [Location]

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Pho Bac 97 – They put the pho in front of me. I dunked my head into the bowl and didn’t take it out, until all the pho was gone. It’s called a “pho-chug” and, yes, that’s something I just invented. [Location]

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Nudo – More incredible hand-pulled Chinese noodles, and the nicest staff you could hope for. Massive portions for such a small price, and extremely delicious. [Location]

Montreal Asian Food

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July 8, 2016 at 12:54 pm Comment (1)

The Maison Saint-Gabriel

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One of finest colonial-era houses in Montreal is the Maison Saint-Gabriel, found in the neighborhood of Pointe Saint-Charles. Purchased in 1662 by Marguerite Bourgeoys for her congregation of nuns, this farmhouse allowed the sisters to be self-sufficient, and provided a place where they could educate community children. In 1966, the house opened its doors as a historic site.

When it was acquired by the Congregation of Notre Dame, the Maison Saint-Gabriel was on the outskirts of the colonial town, then still known as Ville-Marie. Over the centuries, Montreal has grown exponentially, and swallowed up the farmland which once surrounded the house, turning Pointe Saint-Charles into another of its many densely-packed neighborhoods. But, when you step onto the property of the Maison Saint-Gabriel, it feels as though you’re stepping back into the past.

This illusion is encouraged by the maidens who are waiting to greet you at the gates. All of the employees of the Maison are dressed in colonial-era garb. During the summer, they’ll occasionally put on skits, or demonstrate some craft or aspect of life in the olden days.

Although the original farmhouse burnt down in 1693, the reconstruction dates from 1699, making it over three hundred years old. Seemingly little has changed throughout the years. The tour takes you into the kitchen of the house, the basement, the common room, the attic, and the men’s dormitory — although this was a congregation of nuns, some men lived on the farm to assist with the farming. We got to see some of the tools used by the nuns to harvest wheat and grains, and hear the 17th-century “telephone” they used to communicate with sisters on the island across the Saint Lawrence River: a long, trumpet-like megaphone.

We were fascinated by the story of the “Filles du Roi,” or, the “King’s Daughters.” In the earliest days of the colony, there were a disproportionate number of men, which was making it difficult for New France to populate its new territory. To alleviate this problem, King Louis XIV conscripted young peasant girls to cross the ocean and serve as marriage fodder for his struggling colony. Many of these girls provisionally moved into the Maison Saint-Gabriel, under the auspices of the nuns, until they were paired off with a man.

We really enjoyed our tour of the Maison Saint-Gabriel. It’s not just another history museum, but a living window into the past. The girl who gave our tour was as friendly as you’d expect a 17th-century maiden to be, and the condition of the house is stunning, considering its age. It’s definitely worth a trip to Pointe Saint-Charles to check it out.

Location on our Map
Maison Saint-Gabriel – Website

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July 5, 2016 at 2:31 pm Comments (0)

Saint-Louis Square and Rue Prince-Arthur

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Like most cities, Montreal can be ugly and noisy, with its constant construction, heavy traffic, plain gray skyscrapers, chain restaurants, and cloudy days. But it can also be surprisingly beautiful… and nowhere is that more apparent than around Saint-Louis Square, in the neighborhood of the Plateau.

One way to approach Saint-Louis Square is along Rue Prince-Arthur, a pedestrian street that leads from Boulevard Saint-Laurent. This used to be considered one of the top streets in Montreal for dining and nightlife, but its fortunes have taken a downward swing in recent years. It was cool, then gentrified, then known as a tourist trap, then avoided even by tourists, and today most of its buildings are vacant. And all this happened within a couple decades.

Square Sainte Louis Motreal

Today, walking down Prince-Arthur isn’t going to make you swoon with delight, but it’s interesting to see the potential for growth which Montreal still has. I mean, there’s no reason that this pedestrian street, right in the middle of such a cool neighborhood, shouldn’t be able to succeed. I have a feeling that the next phase in Prince-Arthur’s story is coming soon: post-gentrification-regentrification. Savvy investors, get in now!

If Rue Prince-Arthur’s atmosphere is one of lost glory, Saint-Louis Square’s is one of enduring charm. This is possibly the single loveliest square we’ve seen in Montreal. A small park filled with towering trees and crowned with an elegant central fountain, Saint-Louis is surrounded by stone Victorian-style homes with polygonal turrets and brightly-colored friezes.

We’d been in this area numerous times before, whether walking down St. Laurent, getting a drink in the Latin Quarter, or relaxing in the nearby La Fontaine Park. But somehow, we’d never stumbled upon Saint-Louis Square. It feels deliberately tucked away, not quite on any of the main thoroughfares. But it’s worth seeking out, especially if the constant noise and grime of downtown Montreal are getting you down. Grab a coffee and a book, and find a bench; a few minutes in Saint-Louis Square will make you feel better about the city.

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June 27, 2016 at 9:20 pm Comments (0)

The Mansions of the Golden Mile

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There’s nothing rich people enjoy more than lording it over the rest of us, especially when they can do so literally. Montreal began life as a provincial fur-trading village, but as it grew in wealth and prestige, the richest and most powerful members of society started to build fabulous mansions on the slopes of Mont Royal, in a neighborhood which would eventually be coined the “Golden Square Mile.”

Golden Mile Montreal

The Golden Square Mile is found north of downtown, between Rue Sherbrooke and Mont Royal. The neighborhood’s fortunes have mirrored those of the city; when Montreal was a wealthy industrial powerhouse, roughly between 1850 and 1930, the Golden Square Mile was grand beyond belief. But after the Great Depression, WWII and the ensuing deindustrialization, Montreal lost much of its prestige, and its Golden Mile was hit hard. Today, less than 30% of the neighborhood’s original mansions have survived.

Golden Mile Montreal

Luckily, there’s still plenty to see. We walked up Rue Peel, and explored the roads which lead onto the mountain. Streets like the Avenue des Pins and Docteur-Penfield are studded with one magnificent residence after the other. Most of the homes are built with stone (sandstone or granite), and designed in a wide variety of styles, from Gothic to Romanesque.

Some of the best houses are found on a circular road called Redpath Crescent, which is about as high up the hill as it’s possible to build. Each building on this street is unique, and each enjoys a fabulous view over the city. We noticed one stately manor with a “For Sale” sign, and let out a sigh. We’re starting to accept that we’ll never be able to afford such a place. Youthful hope has been replaced in our hearts with resigned envy. And that’s okay. It had to happen at some point.

Location of Redpath Crescent on our Map

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June 26, 2016 at 12:52 pm Comments (0)

A Day in Mile End

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Situated around Boulevard Saint Laurent, immediately south of Little Italy, Mile End has become synonymous with Montreal’s indie music scene. And bagels. And hipsters. We spent a sunny day exploring the streets of one of the city’s most iconic neighborhoods.

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No miles actually end in Mile End; the name is thought to have been inspired by London’s Mile End neighborhood, in the same way Montreal’s Quartier Latin is a nod to Paris. For much of its history, Mile End was an independent town known as Saint-Louis; it didn’t change its name officially until 1982. The stately former town hall of Saint-Louis, built in 1902, is today Montreal’s most attractive fire station.

Years ago, Mile End became the unofficial capital of Montreal’s burgeoning indie music scene, when bands like Arcade Fire and Godspeed You! Black Emperor started to take off. Musicians flooded in, setting up indie labels, performing at local clubs like the Casa del Popolo and la Sala Rossa, and recording at places such as the “thee mighty hotel2tango.” A glance at the list of the artists who’ve worked at this legendary Mile End studio reads like a who’s-who of indie music.

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Rue Bernard is the most iconic street for the young Montreal hipster, and is where you’ll find some of the neighborhood’s most popular shops, such as Drawn and Quarterly (which publishes as well as as sells comics and books), the artistic mecca of Le Dépanneur Café (which has live jazz all day), and a number of cool stores selling vintage clothes and second-hand vinyl.

What’s the opposite of a hipster? A Hasidic Jew? That’s not a bad guess. Somehow, this is the second-most prominent group in Mile End… and I doubt many of them are Arcade Fire fans. As we walked along Rue Hutchinson, on the west of Mile End, almost every single guy we passed was sporting a long black gown and curly black sideburns. After WWII, both Mile End and neighboring Outremont became a place of major resettlement for ultra-conservative Jews.

We had already fallen in love with one of Mile End’s Jewish establishments: St-Viateur Bagels. And today, we decided to check out Fairmount Bagels, their long-time competitor. Since the 1950s, there’s been a battle for dominance between the two shops, and Montrealers are strictly loyal to one or the other. We’ve been warned not to wade into the war between them, since choosing a favorite will alienate approximately half the city… but we like to live dangerously. In our view, St-Viateur is better. There, we said it!

Montreal Mile End

Near Fairmount Bagels, we found Wilenksy’s Light Lunch. Founded in 1932 by Moe Wilensky, this tiny shop has become an institution with its simple sandwiches, pickles and soda frappes. It’s a weird place; just a large empty room with a few stools around the bar. Our Wilensky Specials (salami, bologna and mustard on a toasted bun) arrived fifteen seconds after we had ordered them, and were gone fifteen seconds after that. Luckily, the prices are low enough that a second round wasn’t an outrageous idea.

After lunch, we stood in line for ice cream at the ridiculously popular Kem Coba. Normally, I will avoid long lines for things like ice cream; I hate it when specific shops with hipster names manage to become trendy. There’s a million other ice cream shops in Montreal, but no, everyone has to go to Kem Coba, because it’s Kem Coba, man! It’s the only place I ever eat ice cream, man! But we were still hungry after our Wilensky Light Lunch, so decided to see what the fuss was about. The ice cream was, of course, really good. Not worth the wait, certainly, but if the line happens to be small when you walk by, go for it. (Kem Coba’s Line is so ridiculous, that it has its own Twitter account.)

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From here, it was just a few minutes to the next stupidly popular Mile End institution: Café Olimpico. Crowned the “best cafe in the city” by a few publications, this is the neighborhood’s top spot to see and be seen, and has welcomed stars like Jennifer Lawrence and Will Ferrell. But one glance inside was enough for us. Here was a line in which we wouldn’t be waiting. Anyway, how is it even possible to proclaim which is the “best cafe” in a city the size of Montreal?

In truth, it feels like Mile End’s coolest days are behind it. We saw hipsters, of course, but not as many as I had expected. And while there were a lot of great shops on Rue Bernard, the street didn’t have the energy I’d read so much about. But then, hip scenes are fickle, and I could just imagine some snob snuffing that “Mile End is so 2008.” Overall, though, we enjoyed our time here. With so many unique stores and restaurants, it would have been hard not to.

Locations on our Map: Drawn and Quarterly | Le Dépanneur Café | Fairmount Bagels | Wilensky Light Lunch | Kem Coba | Café Olimpico
Websites: Drawn and Quarterly | Le Dépanneur Café | Fairmount Bagel | Wilensky’s Light Lunch | Kem Coba | Café Olimpico

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June 13, 2016 at 2:28 pm Comment (1)

Montreal’s Latin Quarter

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The Quartier Latin of Paris is famous for its bohemian vibe, with students roaming cobblestone alleys in search of a cheap meal, a good book, or a café in which to while away the hours. But you don’t have to fly to France if you want to experience the same atmosphere. The area around the University of Quebec at Montreal (UQAM) has a such similar feel that it’s been named after its Parisian counterpart.

Latin Quarter

Montreal’s Latin Quarter isn’t on the same scale as the one in Paris. Basically, it’s just Rue St. Denis, between UQAM and Rue Sherbrooke, a few blocks to the north. Wander too far from St. Denis, and you’re no longer in the “Latin Quarter.” It’s such a specific slice of the city, that it shouldn’t even be considered a real neighborhood.

But what a great slice it is. Although the definite highlight is Rue St. Denis with its crowded bars and restaurants, almost all of which have terraces in the summer, there are a couple other spots which merit attention.

Latin Quarter

First is the Bibliothèque et Archives Nationales du Québec (BAnQ), one of the most impressive libraries into which we’ve ever set foot. With five floors that store an insane collection of music, movies, magazines and books, it’s both massive and beautifully designed, and feels more like a museum than a library. One cool touch is the glass walls which allow you to watch a book’s journey from the “return slot,” through the library to an automated sorting station.

Near the BAnQ, we found the Cinémathèque Québécoise, which has been collecting and archiving world cinema for over fifty years, protecting it for future generations. Every day, they screen a few films, from newer art-house releases to classics you’ve probably never heard of. As an example of their eclecticism, two of the cycles showing during our visit were “Tango and Cinema” and “The Avant-Garde Mutes.”

Latin Quarter

We now turned our attention to Rue St. Denis, the heart of Montreal’s Latin Quarter, where almost every building is a restaurant, almost every restaurant has a terrace set up, and almost every terrace is completely full. With patience, we managed to grab seats at Cinko, where all of the plates are just five dollars… definitely a dining concept that must appeal to students.

After eating, we found a couple of cool bars that also seem geared to the younger generations. One was Arcade Montreal, with a bunch of old-school arcade games, but even better was the Randolph Pub, with its collection of over 1000 board games. In the evenings, this place gets packed to capacity, with people eager to disconnect from Facebook and interact with actual humans over a drink and a fun game.

Locations on our Map: BAnQ | Cinémathèque Québécoise | Cinko | Randolph Pub
Websites: BAnQ | Cinémathèque Québécoise

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May 28, 2016 at 5:55 pm Comments (0)

The Écomusée du Fier Monde

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Found within the former Généreux public bath hall on Rue Amherst, across from the Marché Saint-Jacques, the Écomusée du Vier Monde shines a light on the working-class community of Montreal’s Centre-Sud. We visited the museum, and then took a walk around the neighborhood to which it’s dedicated.

Ecomusee du fier monde

Not speaking French, I had no idea what “fier monde” might mean. Mentally, I had prepared myself for either the “Museum of Four Moons” or the “Museum of Fear World.” So, I was a little disappointed to learn that “fier monde” means something like “proud people”… not as exciting as Fear World, but we decided to check it out, anyway.

The Industrial Revolution was a turbulent time for Montreal, during which it rocketed past Quebec City and Toronto to become the richest and most influential city in Canada. The factories and the people who worked in them were based mostly in the Centre-Sud section of the city; basically, everything to the east of the Boulevard St. Laurent and south of Rue Sherbrooke.

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As neighborhoods full of factory workers tend to be, this was a low-income area with squalid living conditions. The Écomusée begins its story during the Industrial Revolution, introducing the lives and struggles of the shift-workers and their families. You learn about the attempts to unionize, and other ways the people of the Centre-Sud organized themselves to improve their lot.

Those early efforts at solidarity would pay off following World War II, when Montreal began to de-industrialize. The factories which had provided the people a living wage closed up completely, or moved out to the suburbs. With no ready jobs, the Centre-Sud became an area of severe poverty, as the families who had the means to escape did so. To survive, the remaining community had to band together, providing basic education and services to its least-fortunate members, and fighting for governmental aid.

Today, life has improved tremendously in the Centre-Sud, and it’s become one of Montreal’s most vibrant areas. The factories never returned, but that’s become less important. The Gay Village is part of the former “fauborg” (suburb), as is the post-industrial neighborhood of Sainte-Marie. Artists and young people have been moving in, drawn by the prime location and relatively cheap prices.

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The Écomusée does a good job in describing all this history with a set of exhibits that form a loop around the former pool of the Généreux baths. Built in 1927, this bath hall is itself a part of the Centre-Sud’s history, dating from a time when most residents didn’t have running water of their own, and depended upon such public solutions for their hygienic needs.

The museum is small, and doesn’t take much time to tour. But afterwards, you’ll probably want to spend some time walking around the streets of the Centre-Sud, to see first-hand how it’s matured into the modern day. In many ways, the story of this area is the story of Montreal, and it’s worth stopping in to the Écomusée du Fier Monde to learn about it.

Location on our Map
Écomusée du Vier Monde – Website

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May 27, 2016 at 10:07 pm Comments (2)

Lunchtime in Little Italy

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If you follow St. Laurent north, past the train tracks and Rosemont Boulevard, you end up in the neighborhood of Little Italy, which has long been home to Montreal’s Italian expat community. With espresso cafes, pizzerias, upscale restaurants, and pastry shops, Little Italy is a place you should visit when you’re hungry, and not leave until you’re stuffed as full as a cannoli.

Little Italy Montreal

The motherland’s influence is strong in this neighborhood, but you’re not going to mistake the streets of Little Italy for those of Rome or Palermo. This is still Montreal, through and through, with its grid-like layout and winding exterior staircases attached to squat three-story residences. But close your eyes, listen, and inhale… now, you’re in Italy! The sounds of the marketplace, the smell of coffee beans and pizza crust… Mamma mía, siamo a casa! Mangiamo!

The food will come, but first let’s take a walk and build our appetites. Jürgen and I started our day at the Marché Jean-Talon, and headed south. Italians have been part of Montreal’s story since the 17th century, and were some of the first immigrants to arrive in the city, working mostly on the railway. The biggest wave, however, came after World War II. Today, a quarter of a million Italians live in Montreal.

Little Italy Montreal

The neighborhood’s most important church is the red-brick Madonna della Difesa, which was built in 1919. This was prior to the war, so the church’s famous fresco of Benito Mussolini isn’t quite as offensive as it might be. All of the paintings inside the church are by Guido Nincheri, an Italian immigrant to Montreal also responsible for the frescoes of the Château Dufresne.

Alright, that’s twenty minutes of sight-seeing, good enough. It’s lunchtime! We grabbed tables at the Pizzeria Napoletana, a classic restaurant near the Madonna della Difesa. The place was crowded, and as we waited for our pizzas, I noticed our fellow diners pulling bottles of wine out of their backpacks. In Montreal, many restaurants allow you to bring your own wine, and they don’t charge you any sort of corking fee.

Little Italy Montreal

I looked longingly at Jürgen, who said, “Go, Michael, go,” and I was off; out the door and into the depanneur across the street. Minutes later, our beefcake Italian waiter was uncorking the bottle. The pizzas, by the way, were perfect. I had a simple margherita that was to die for. After eating, we made a beeline for the nearby Patisserie Alati-Caserta, where we had seen cannolis in the window. This was turning into a gluttonous day, and we couldn’t have been happier.

We walked west along Calle Dante, passing a bar named Inferno (naturally), until finding the Quincaillerie Dante: an awesome little shop selling espresso machines, kitchen gadgets and … shotguns? Looks like we’re still in Canada, after all.

By now, we had reached Boulevard St. Laurent and the famous Milano Supermarket. We had heard a lot about this place, and wondered how a simple supermarket might achieve such popularity. But now, we understood. True to its name, Milano is as Italian as supermarkets come. Right after entering, you encounter bags of homemade pastas. This store has as many varieties of olive oils, as other supermarkets have cereal brands. The wines, and the sweets and the sauces and the cheese … I will dream of you, Milano!

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We finished off our tour of Little Italy with espresso at the Caffè Italia, next to the supermarket. All of the tables were occupied, mostly with retired Italian men who probably meet here every single day, and we grabbed the last two stools at the bar. We sipped our coffee as slowly as possible, and listened to the old guys grumble about politics and sports. It seemed like the perfect way to end a perfect day in Little Italy.

Locations on our Map: Marché Jean-Talon | Madonna della Difesa | Pizzeria Napoletana | Patisserie Alati-Caserta | Milano Supermarket | Caffè Italia

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May 14, 2016 at 9:03 pm Comments (2)

Montreal’s Gay Village

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One of the largest gay villages in the Western Hemisphere is in Montreal. A square of blocks centered around Rue St. Catherine, Le Village has provided a place of acceptance and inclusion for the city’s gay community since the 1970s.

Gay Village Montreal

Our personal observation is that “gayborhoods” such as Le Village seem to be on their way out, and we’re alright with that. Jürgen and I were lucky to come of age just as gays were being accepted in the mainstream community. When I came out to my friends, not a single one tried to beat me up; in fact, the most common response was “Cool!” It was as though they were happy to finally have a fabulous gay friend. (They quickly learned that being gay did not automatically make me fabulous… I was still the same sloppily-dressed computer nerd I’d always been.)

But I digress. The point is, my coming out process wasn’t filled with the anguish and sequestration experienced by legions before me. I wasn’t expelled by my family or renounced by my friends, and there was no need to seek solace in a neighborhood of like souls. I could comfortably go to “straight bars” (and even meet guys), and my straight friends had no problem accompanying me to the “gay bars.” It’s become all mixed up… which is the way it should be; it’s the very thing for which prior generations fought.

Gay Village Montreal

Which brings us to Montreal’s Gay Village: a paradise for the young gay man of 1979. There are strip joints, cruising saunas, drag shows, sex shops and bars with names like “Le Stud.” It’s the kind of place you might see the bear flag flying. Le Village might be a time warp, but we love it. Even if we can feel comfortable at a rowdy sports bar, it’s refreshing to be somewhere that gay guys aren’t the exception, but the rule. A place where banks advertise with the rainbow flag. Where even the neighborhood church has an AIDS memorial.

Montreal’s Gay Village came into being in the 1970s and 80s, after the forced closure of a number of gay establishments in other parts of the city. The city was making an effort clean up “undesirables,” but gays are like weeds. You’ll never completely be rid of us, we’ll just sprout up somewhere else!

Naturally, Montreal’s gays and lesbians now thrive all over the city, but a huge majority of the gay-themed bars and shops are still concentrated in the Gay Village, particularly along Rue St. Catherine. We spent many evenings here, underneath the pink balls which are installed over the street during the summer, and we always had a good time. It might not be 1979 anymore, but Le Village has managed to stay cool.

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Cheap Flights To Montreal

Gay Village Montreal
Gay Village Montreal
Gay Village Montreal
Gay Village Montreal
Gay Village Montreal
Gay Village Montreal
Gay Village Montreal
Gay Village Montreal
Gay Village Montreal
Gay Village Montreal
Gay Village Montreal
Gay Village Montreal
Gay Village Montreal
Gay Village Montreal
Gay Village Montreal
Gay Village Montreal
Gay Village Montreal
Gay Village Montreal
Gay Village Montreal
Gay Village Montreal
Gay Village Montreal
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May 9, 2016 at 7:34 pm Comments (0)

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